‘Over the Sea to Skye’

The Isle of Skye isn’t exactly easy to get to. The best way, in my opinion, is by car. If you’re reliant on public transport, you have to get a bus or coach from Inverness or Fort William. There is also the option of a ferry. It’s a long journey to Scotland’s largest and most northern of the Inner Hebrides (or Inner Isles), but it’s definitely worth making the trek, no matter how you choose to get there.

scottish-highlands

Scottish Highlands, 2016. c. Leah Putz

If you’re traveling by car or bus, you’ll most likely cross over the Skye bridge connecting the island to Eileen Ban. The bridge, thin and high over the sea, provides incredible views of the Highlands as you roll into the village of Kyleakin on Skye.

After arriving in Skye, my friend and I decided to hop into the car and drive with no particular destination, but just pulling over whenever we saw something interesting. Even just driving around aimlessly in Skye is breathtaking. The narrow, winding roads prevent you from going too fast, so it’s easy to admire the Highland views of the island. Our first stop was Kilt Rock.

kilt-rock

Mealt Falls and Kilt Rock, 2016. c. Joe Forberg

Kilt Rock is a rock formation on a cliff edge that is said to resemble a pleated kilt (hence the name). The long section of coastal cliffs offer impeccable views, especially with the added nearby Mealt Falls tumbling from the cliff edge into the sea. The view from this vantage point presents one of the most breathtaking instances of natural beauty that I’ve seen as of yet in the world. Photos can’t do it justice, you’ll just have to journey to Skye to see what I mean!

coast-of-skye

Coast of Skye, 2016. c. Joe Forberg

Our next stop was the famed Old Man of Storr. This site is easy to miss if you aren’t paying attention. It’s not visible from the road, there is just a sign signalling that it’s nearby and that if you stop and park, you can begin the hike to find it. It’s a vigorous hike- though there is a clear path it’s super steep at times and covers a distance of almost 4k. Without the proper shoes it could be very difficult. It’s well worth the extra effort, though. The unique rock formation comprised of stony pinnacles is one of the most sought after destinations on the Isle of Skye, and understandably so. The congregation of stones and their thin, tall towers seem almost other-worldly- like something from Middle-Earth or some other fantasy land.

old-man-of-storr

Old Man of Storr, 2016. c. Joe Forberg

Last but certainly not least, we swung by the Fairy Pools in Glen Brittle. Regrettably we don’t have any pictures of this last stop, but it’s was pouring buckets (in typical Scottish fashion) and we didn’t want to get our cameras/phones wet. The fairy pools are a collection of small waterfalls in the Glen that empty into a clear pool. On a nicer day, it’s popular with swimmers who dare to brave the freezing water.

We only had a day to explore, so didn’t get the chance to see more of the numerous sites. Some of the things that we missed that will make certain to check out next time are the Quiraing, Neist Point Lighthouse, and Boreraig, among others. Full of natural wonders and breathtaking beauty, the Isle of Skye is not to be missed.

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